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Sex & the City seminar series

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Mondays, June 1, July 6, August 10
Sex & the City
Seminars in the City
Center for Gay & Lesbian Studies

Many imagine the city to be the locus of non-normative sexual practices and identities, be it a site of refuge or risk, community or alienation, pleasure or danger. In other words, artists, policy makers, scholars, and activists alike have painted visions of the city as a playground for outlaws, as a homeland for outcasts, as a center of pathology, and as the promise of new possibilities. Sex and the City will feature a series of seminars focusing on the history and contemporary experiences of sexual and gender minorities in particular lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender people in the U.S. city from the late 19th century to the present.

The series will focus on the policing of sex (from Progressive-era anti-vice campaigns to new quality-of-life policies), rural-to-urban migration narratives, and the history of so-called gay neighborhoods. Sub-topics include debates about public sex, gentrification, violence, and social movements. Throughout we will ask: What is the relationship between sexuality and race, gender, and class in the urban environment? How might cultural practices and social policy speak to each other? What makes a place gay or lesbian or queer? What counts as a safe space? To whom does the city belong, and who has the power to change it? Possible authors include John D’Emilio, Judith Halberstam, Samuel Delany, Michael Warner, Nayan Shah, Audre Lorde, Kath Weston, Martin Manalansan, Manuel Castells, Kevin Mumford, George Chauncey, Elizabeth Lapovsky Kennedy and Madeline D. Davis.

Seminar Facilitator:
Christina B. Hanhardt, Department of American Studies, LGBT Studies Program, University of Maryland, College Park
Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual & Transgender Community Center
208 West 13th Street
Room 101
New York. NY 10011
Mondays, 6-8pm

Seminars in the City is supported by the New York Council for the Humanities