In light of religious terrorist attacks in Paris, please see Category:blasphemy!

We only care about hookers when a monster strike

From Freedom Porn
Jump to: navigation, search

We only care about hookers when a monster strike (sic) is an article by India Knight publiced on 2010 May 30 in The Sunday Times. The article deals with the fact that our society only speaks of prostitutes when they are getting killed by some serial murderer, and then only because of the sensationalism of those tragedies and in a way that degrades prostitutes.

The author suggests that complete legalisation of prostitution, with the state-run brothels would almost completely eliminate these types of murders and asks why the people who claim to represent women abandon those who need help the most. The ‘streetwalkers’, the prostututes who work on the streets, are identified as the most disempowered out of all the sex workers, and it is them who the brothels would really help.

India Knight recognises that most likely the people, having encountered the idea of such brothels, would often commit to “not in my backyard” mentality.

The author suggests in this article that people should only call prostitutes ‘sex workers’, because the latter identifies how a person works and the former who the person is.

“And the first reaction of some people is to put pen to paper, or finger to keypad, and berate the media for, basically, not calling them dirty whores, for dignifying their occupation with the word “worked” — as though, off-duty, prostitutes made tea in a special prostitute way, or bought baked beans in a typically prostituty fashion, or sat on a bench staring at the clouds in the way that only hookers can.”

Criticism

The legalisation of prostitution often does not provide the results promiced when it comes to empowering sex workers in general and prostitutes specifically. In Nevada prositutes who are officially registered with a brothel are not allowed to leave the building in the evening or at night; sometimes “their own protection” is cited as a reason, but more often then not it is the social fear that the prostitutes will be poluting the area with their presence.

Nanny state is not much better than the current state of affairs, rather than legalisation many prostitutes speak of decriminalisation of prostitution and empowering them to take control over their lives. All sex workers, for example, should be allowed to only give their working pseudonym to the police if they are approached in regard to something that deals with their work (because anonymity is very important for sex workers); sex workers should also be allowed to set up their own brothels maybe with the help of state funding (but not state-control).

As for the term ‘sex worker’, it is much more inclusive than a prositute. In other word: every prostitute is a sex worker, but not every sex worker is a prostitute. This is, of course, not meant to imply that sex workers should not show support to each other, but we must recognise that there are significant differences in the way people are treated and mistreated by the society (and those differences will translate into different tactics when it comes to combat the abuses).

External link